Joy

White blouse and long pants. Like a high-wire walker, Joy balances femininity and professionalism, family and business, logic and love.

As an advocate for equal pay, Oscar winner Jennifer Lawrence truly embraced her character as an unexpected but steadfast matriarch of a crazy family. To name a few, she has to deal with an ex-husband (Edgar Ramirez) who lives in their basement, a father (Robert de Niro) who was returned by his second wife, a mother (Virginia Madsen) obsessed with watching soap operas and the only saving grace, a grandmother (Diane Ladd) who fiercely instilled ambition in her.

The film has tantalizing visuals, clever use of dreams and TV scenes and inspiring musical scores. The story is scattered with flashbacks and fast-forwards, chaotic in nature, like mixing business with family. As messy as business can be, the trials and tribulations create an opportunity for Joy. It gives a reason to pursue her dream or rather, demands her to go back to the one thing where she felt most herself – creating through her hands.

Time passes and challenges become victories when she take matters to her own hands, her ingenious idea materialized into a product that becomes a business and this business becomes an empire. Through her innate creativity and incessant stubbornness, Joy shows  anyone can rise from the depths of the earth with grace even when it’s muddy down there.

 

 

 

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Suffragette

Stellar performances, sublime cinematography and an important cause – this historical drama is quite close to perfection. Almost, because there are questions on whether this film represented ‘white feminism’ and completely ignored ‘intersectional feminism’.

The intensity of emotions was magnificently captured and the music complemented the tone in every scene, whether a small triumph or unspeakable sorrow.

Carey Mulligan was electrifying in her role as Maud Watts, a suffragette whose life represented countless women that devoted their lives to the cause at grass-roots level. She participated in acts of defiance and serves time at prison during which force feeding was allowed. In the same vein, Helena Bonham Carter shined as Edith Ellyn, a more senior suffragette whose heart illness did not interfere with her relentless pursuit for justice.

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Surrealism Exhibition – National Gallery of Victoria  (Photo by: Julia Velez)

Even with only a few minutes of screen time, Meryl Streep did not disappoint. Her eloquence, conviction and passion for the cause reflected that of the real Emmeline Pankhurst, an iconic British figure of the early 20th century suffrage movement.

These real women of courage were beautifully portrayed by these actresses. However there was an apparent lack of characters portraying women of colour, which has been termed “erasure” by critics. This is the cause of accusations on being racially insensitive on the part of modern day film makers. Historically accurate or not, the decision to exclude cultural diversity in the film was in my eyes, questionable.

Whilst bearing this issue in mind, this film remains powerful and heart-wrenching, visually captivating and emotionally raw. It delves into gender inequality, the daily challenges of ordinary women at the time when strength of human character was tested but never faltered.

“You don’t have to know you’re going to die before you start living.”

You can either sit in the basement and wait. OR you can get out there and do some crazy stuff.

It’s really simple. Life is about making people happy. Sometimes you have to learn it the hard way.

I want to be remembered as the kid who went down fighting. And didn’t really lose.

Try and see what happens…

People being people.
People being people.

“Instead of putting others down, try improving yourself
instead. The only person you have a right to compete with is
you. In the meantime, treat others how you’d like to be
treated. One trait that some of the best (communicators) share
is empathy. A couple of kind words can not only make a
person’s day, but earn you a friend and supporter for life.
For the rest of the week, whenever you see someone you want to
judge negatively, pay them a compliment instead. See what
happens.”

— Neil Strauss

Believe

You know those geeks with glasses and braces or those nerds who hang out at the library? Where do they end up? They end up being the millionaires. They end up at the peak of the tower, they end up succeeding in life. I still believe in underdogs, underdogs always win. I am an underdog myself and I quite like it.

Yes, I am one of those nerds/geeks. I had braces from Grade 3 until Grade 7. I started wearing glasses when I turned sixteen, oh what a great Sweet Sixteen surprise – NOT. I do find comfort in being surrounded by books – pages and pages of marvellous out of this world extraordinary ideas, characters, stories. They live and breathe in your imagination. They live through you and within you. Once you’ve encountered them, you become inseparable and you can never look at something – even just one thing – the same way that you did before.

Oddly enough, anyone can write. Just get a pen and a paper. Or if you’re lazy, like most of us 21st generation kids, you sit on the most comfortable chair that you can find in your house and start typing on your computer, laptop, iPad, iPod or iPhone. What else did I miss? I prefer using the iPen by the way; I guess I’m traditional and conservative in that sense, just my opinion.

It’s raining. It’s pouring. You know what I love to do at times like these? I read. Or write. Or both. Most of the time, in the library at school. I don’t mind being a loner. Yes, that is one more nerdy quality about me. I’m happy being alone. I’m not lonely, just alone. I love silence, it calms my mind and my soul and gives me peace.

Geeks are fearful too. I personally have a lot of fears. Too many to mention. I also fear having a fear and being fearful. When you’re scared, amazing things happen. It blows your mind and takes your breath away. That’s why we do everything at the last minute. We thrive, we conquer our fear and survive.

What’s the best thing that ever happened to you?

I asked this question in Omegle.com… interesting replies!

Stranger 1: Died for three seconds.

Stranger 2: Discovered meditation. I know have the ability to feel happy.

Stranger 3: Got hit by a car and skipping school.

Stranger 4: Finished chemo therapy.

Stranger 5: This conversation.

Stranger 6: This website.

Stranger 7: I crashed through a window in high school. Got some cool scars. And it didn’t hurt that much.

Stranger 8: Erm. Nothing realllyyyy.

Stranger 9: Getting laid.

Stranger 10: Hasn’t happened yet. But I know what it’ll be. The day I DIE. (then disconnects)

The Secrets People Tell

“How I wish I could hug everyone and tell them that it’s okay. It’s okay to be scared and angry and hurt and selfish. It’s part of being human,”
Frank Warren, PostSecret: Extraordinary Confessions from Ordinary Lives

It is highly addictive. You want to know what nobody knows or at least, you’d like to think so.

Earthlings who may or may not have a broken family, a BMW, an apartment and a fluffy dog named “Fluffy” would send a postcard to Frank Warren’s address. It then gets published in the PostSecret website and with a touch of a finger, people from China to Iceland to Nepal and every other place in between will know your secret. Except they won’t know it’s yours.

Founder Frank Warren can quite possibly bring us closer and make us feel more connected through the “largest advertisement-free blog in the world”: PostSecret. Or does it?

For some who enjoy “people watching” and imagining how strangers live their lives or those whose curiosity simply cannot be contained, these raw and real confessions are a glimpse into the unknown: a snippet of a person’s life.

Source: http://www.justjared.com/2007/03/11/post-secret-mystery-celebrity-dad/

Perhaps as we look through a tiny hole, created by every secret revealed, we might come to see signs of desperation, hear the voice of the voiceless or feel a tinge of joy in humanity’s unheralded achievements – all depending on the way you interpret the words on the postcard, each is a product of a person’s creativity.

PostSecret ask people to:

 Reveal anything – as long as it is true and you have never shared it with anyone before.

Heart wrenching, alarming, poignant, profound, ridiculously funny – you never know what to expect. Like a thread that binds all secrets, one thing you can find in common is the inexplicable feeling upon seeing humanity at its finest: beautiful, flaws and all.

Who knows, maybe someone you know revealed something they’d never tell you or perhaps you may come across a secret you keep to yourself.

For Mother’s Day secrets that will shock you, inspire you or make you feel lucky enough to have a mum visit http://www.postsecret.com/

Listen to the founder himself and may it give you something good, no matter what it is.

“It’s the children the world almost breaks who grow up to save it.” ― Frank Warren